Susie Mallett

Wednesday, 13 July 2016

The ramp that connects Conductive Lifestylers and patents in Frankonia

My neighbours get to hear lots about my conductive lifestyle stories. When they needed to take some photographs to illustrate how life with a disability can be made easier though use of a product that they produce in their small engineering works they knew just who to turn to – Susie Mallett’s Conductive Lifestyle team!

My neighbours, the Kastners, produce the ramps that cover cables and water pipes at rock concerts and funfairs. We all know them but we also all take them for granted.

Perhaps not many people have tried to go over these ramps other than by foot, but try riding a bike, pushing a pushchair or negotiating a wheelchair over one; it is not a pleasant experience. It is a very bumpy ride.

Recently my neighbours were asked to develop a new version of these ramps that is much longer than the originals that will make using a child’s buggy or a wheelchair at a rock concert much easier - unfortunately it cannot help against all that mud! 

Once these ramps were successfully in production the design was patented.

The call for my help came just a few weeks ago when the Kastners were asked to display their wares at a local exhibition of industrial patents from Frankonia. They needed a few photos for their presentation and with our summer fete coming up three of my conductive lifestylers were able to help out, test riding the ramps.


Conductive lifestylers – people who having chosen to learn through conductive pedagogy decide to live their lives conductively.

Sunday, 1 May 2016

Developing life skills in the conductive environment

"Oli, aged 3, teaches his Great-Granddad, aged 89, how to use the computer!"

On Saturday we organised an information day for the parents of children who attend conductive groups and Kindergartens. They were given the opportunity to talk with conductors, school assistants, children, students and other parents about the many possible paths that their children could take through the education system.

For three of our school children it was a new experience in their social development. They were present because it was their experiences as children in mainstream education that the parents were most eager to hear. Two of the children who have speech difficulties had chosen to have others speak for them but answered questions confidently. The third child was very brave and said a few words herself about her school life to a smaller group of people.

It was lovely to see how these children now take this kind of experience in their stride. We try to offer them as many opportunities as possible, within the sheltered community of the charity that provides their conductive education, to widen their horizons and practise their social skills. This helps them to feel more confident at school when they must stand before the class and speak on different subjects, when they take oral exams and when they spend  a week or two in work experience placements.

Present yesterday was a young lady who was one of our very first children in the conductive education groups. She was also the very first child to be provided with a school assistant by the charity that now, more than 15 years later, provides well over 200 children with school assistants. 

This young lady is now coming to the end of her three-year Bachelor Degree and she still has a personal assistant. The three teenagers from our afternoon group were wide eyed and opened mouthed as they listened to this uni-student talk with such composure of her school experiences. She provided such a wonderful example for them of what they too can achieve through their own inniative and with the help of the team around them.

We reached far fewer people yesterday than we had hoped for, but for the children who took part in the discussion circle, and were not tempted by the wonderful woodwork-workshop that was going on next door, it was a huge step in their social development and I think that they learnt much that will help them and their parents with future decision making.

Monday, 8 June 2015

A conductive upbringing

Little Princess

Some families just do it.   

Little Princess and her family are so motivated that they just have a go at anything that comes their way. Little Princess is included in everything and she also initiates many actions herself.

A few days before the weekend of the Blue Night in Nürnberg when museums and galleries open their doors late into the night and when many new creative projects take place, all that was needed was to suggest in hearing distance of Little Princess we all meet in the city at some point during the evening.

Little Princess was immediately tuned in and the following day had everything sorted out. All that we were relying on was the weather to play along.

It was a dull rainy day on the Saturday in question but at the last minute, well into the evening the weather cleared and I received a message on my phone from Little Princess informing me that she, her brother and their French exchange guest and her mum were about to leave their house. I had a ten minute walk to town so I slowly made by way to our meeting place.

We enjoyed a couple of hours amongst the crowds before returning home to our beds just before midnight.

I was so impressed with the way that Little Princess whizzed amongst the crowds in her wheelchair, her head at elbow height, without a care in the world. She was thoroughly enjoying her very first Blue Night experience. I hope we share many more Blue Nights and other such events in the future because I always find Little Princess’s presence so inspiring.